Categories
BLOG

do regular light bulbs help plants grow

How to Grow a Seed Inside With a Regular Light Bulb

Related Articles

Indoor lighting provides a way to start seedlings indoors, even if you have poor window exposure or long, overcast days. Seedlings grow best when provided with light that provides both red and blue light wavelengths. Fluorescent full-spectrum lights work best because they provide the necessary wavelength and don’t heat up, but an incandescent light bulb can work in a pinch. Incandescent lights primarily supply the red spectrum. While heat from incandescent lights can pose a problem to plants, you can usually overcome this so the seedlings still produce strong early growth.

Sow seeds in seedling flats or pots set inside a drip tray. Most seedlings will germinate within seven to 14 days, and most will do so without light. When a seed variety does require light, it usually isn’t intense light. Place these near a sunny window or set them where they receive incandescent light for most of the day until they sprout.

Set the seedlings beneath the incandescent light fixture after they germinate. Adjust the height of the fixture so it sits at least 12 inches above the top of the seedlings so it doesn’t overheat the soil.

Place a thermometer at seedling level. Monitor the temperature throughout the day to ensure it doesn’t rise above 75 degrees Fahrenheit. Adjust the light’s height upward if the temperature begins to get too high.

Leave the light on for 14 to 16 hours daily, turning it off at night. Plug the light into an automatic timer to ensure it’s on for the correct amount of time.

Monitor soil moisture and water the seedlings when the soil surface dries. The soil may dry more rapidly under incandescent lights, so check it at least once a day.

Adjust the height of the light to maintain the 12-inch space between the light and the top of the seedlings as they grow.

How to Grow a Seed Inside With a Regular Light Bulb. Indoor lighting provides a way to start seedlings indoors, even if you have poor window exposure or long, overcast days. Seedlings grow best when provided with light that provides both red and blue light wavelengths. Fluorescent full-spectrum lights work best …

What Makes Grow Lights Different From The Lamps In Your House?

How do lamps make, shall we say, pretty flowers grow? And what’s the difference between these lamps and the ones that light your house?

The sun beats down on the earth, directly or indirectly supporting the vast majority of life on the planet. Why don’t light bulbs, without the aid of the sun, do the same? Traditional light bulbs don’t help plants along, or at least not very well, because of two problems: spectrum and heat. Light bulbs produce a lot of heat to go along with their light, scorching plants if they get too close. And they often get put too close because they don’t provide enough power along the right wavelengths of light. Photosynthesis in different plants, at different stages, uses different wavelengths of light. Anything not the right length can’t be absorbed by the plant.

Foliage is usually produced by blue shades of light for wide foliage, while the red and orange shades often spur fruit and flower production. Regular incandescent bulbs give off more yellow and orange light, starving leafy plants while they burn them.

Fluorescent bulbs are good for younger plants, that aren’t ready to make fruit or flowers yet (although these bulbs can provide the full spectrum of light needed to grow). They can also be run at low power, close to the plants, since they don’t give off much heat. This, from the grower’s point of view, is the best energy relationship.

The gold standard for growing plants is a combination of halide and high pressure sodium lights. Halides fill in the blue spectrum, while sodium, which burns an orange-red, helps flowers and fruit develop. Those who don’t care too much about the leaves of plants will sometimes use sodium lights alone, but they run flat into the old problem of regular incandescents. High pressure sodium lights give off enough heat that they need to be used with a ventilation system. It’s always a trade-off between nourishing your plants and burning them up.

How do lamps make, shall we say, pretty flowers grow? And what's the difference between these lamps and the ones that light your house?