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The difference in Chengdu’s hot pot and dry pot

“Hot pot” and “dry pot” are two must-try cuisines while traveling in China, especially in Sichuan province and Chongqing municipality, where these two delicious dishes originated from and where both of these dishes have already been recognized as tempting travel attractions. Hot pot and dry pot are actually closely related in Chinese cuisine, but each offers enjoyable differences for diners.

Hot pot could be called the Chinese version of fondue – a simmering communal pot in the center of the table filled with spicy broth, served with all kinds of raw food items beside the pot to be added over the course of the meal, such as sliced meats, mushrooms, eggs, and other vegetables. Whether hailing from Chengdu or Chongqing, hot pot centers around the broth in the pot – a variety of spicy ingredients, some sort of beef tallow or vegetable oil, and herbs – to produce a special broth.

Part of the fun of hot pot is that it is do-it-yourself. Diners select their favorite fare and slide them into the communal pot and then conversate while they wait for their desired foods to cook. The cooked food is eaten with a dipping sauce which are usually sesame oil along with smashed garlic ginger and caraway. The relatively intimate manner of hot pot dining helps narrow down people’s distance and is often favored by groups of friends hanging out together.

If you want to taste the hot and spicy flavor without the sweaty heat of huddling over a boiling pot of hot broth when dinning, dry pot is your best choice. Dry pot, developed from hot pot, has the same intense spicy flavor but no boiling broth, just as its name implies.

In dry pot, there are normally one or two kinds of meat served as the core of the entree (normally you can choose chicken meat, rabbit meat, beef, shrimp, or a mix of two kinds of meat), along with all kinds of vegetables, usually potatoes, cucumber, lotus root, onions, etc., each keeping its distinct flavor while blending marvelously together.

All of the spices and herbs that give hot pot broth its savory aroma are present in dry pot, alive and undiluted. All of the wonderful ingredients are mixed together in a giant bowl which arrives at your table with everything pre-cooked to perfection, saving you all the effort of putting all the dishes into broth and waiting when eating hot pot, without sacrficing the delicious flavor!

The difference in Chengdu’s hot pot and dry pot “Hot pot” and “dry pot” are two must-try cuisines while traveling in China, especially in Sichuan province and Chongqing municipality, where these

China S i chuan Food

Chinese Recipes and Eating Culture

Chinese Dry Pot | Shrimp

December 3, 2012 2 Comments

Chinese Dry Pot is a newly rising member of hot pot family. This is the ultimate guide of making shirmp dry pot at home. The Photos and recipe are updated on 12.27.2013.

Today, I will introduce one dry pot with shrimp as main ingredients. The whole process might be a little bit complex since it is not a simplified but comprehensive version.

Now dry pot becomes quite popular all around China. It is a new type of hot pot, which does not have soup base comparing with the traditional hot pot.

I also make pork and white radish dry pot, for that recipe, please check my post Pork Dry Pot with White Radish

For the ingredients part, drp pot always conbimes meat with vegetables. In Chinese cooking theory, we emphasize on the balance of meat and vegetables. Only health recipes and dish can be popular on people’s table.

Let have a glance of the side ingredients. I use celery, mushroom, wood ear and fresh cucumber as the side ingredients.

In China, we always think that too much spices might bring too much hot to human body (上火 in Chinese) and in order to reduce the hot bought by this dish, some fresh vegetables are added.

One of the most important fundamental theories of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is “four natures”including “cold”, “cool”, “warm”and “hot”, which is asummary of clinical experiences.

Celery and cucumber belongs to cold while peppers and other spices used in this recipe belongs to warm and hot.

Seasoning:

  • 10 dry red peppers
  • 1 tbs Sichuan peppercorn
  • 4 pieces of bay leaves
  • 2 pieces of cassia
  • 3

5star anise

  • 1 tbs fennel
  • 5 garlic cloves
  • 1 section of ginger
  • Step one: non-spicy soup
    1. Add some water into a wok, then put bay leaves, star anise, cassia, Sichuan peppercorn and fennel to cook for 5 minutes. Pour out soup only and save in a bowl.
    2. Heat up some oil in wok, put garlic and ginger in to stir-fry until smelling the aroma.
    3. Pour the water cooked with seasoning into wok and simmer for 30 minutes. Save the soup in a bowl and set aside.

    Step two: spicy soup
    1. Heat up some oil again in a wok. Add doubanjiang or other chili paste to stir-fry until the oil becomes light red.
    2. Take two teaspoons of soup cooked in step one and add to wok. Heating to boiling. Then save in a bowl.

    NOTE: Now we should have two bowls of different soups. The first is flavor but not spicy and the second on is spicy.

    Step three: main process

    Heat up oil in wok, and then stir fry shrimp to golden-brown. I do not use deep fry for the consideration of health. But you can use deepf-fry in this step if you want to make the shirmp crisper.

    Heat up some oil in wok; add ginger and garlic to stir-fry. Then put cooked red pepper and Sichuan peppercorn in and stir-fry with high heat.

    Then add cooked vegetables and pork, one tablespoon of soup (non spicy one), sugar and salt to continue stir-fry until all the ingredients are surfaced with non-spicy soup.

    Add the spicy soup averagely and garnish some roasted sesame seeds and chopped spring onions.

    China S i chuan Food Chinese Recipes and Eating Culture Chinese Dry Pot | Shrimp December 3, 2012 2 Comments Chinese Dry Pot is a newly rising member of hot pot family. This is the