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Why Do Marijuana and Reggae Go Together?

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Why Do Marijuana and Reggae Go Together ?

Are weed and reggae really a match made in heaven?

What comes to mind when you hear reggae? For many, there are associated thoughts of Rastafaria and marijuana since reggae music has popularly been accompanied to the philosophy of marijuana smoking. But for others, it has established somewhat of the chicken or the egg dilemma where it’s undefined if reggae music is really a product of marijuana smoking, or merely the culture of marijuana smoking was strengthened by reggae music.

For many fans of music, marijuana and reggae are enigmatically connected. When people think reggae, they usually think of dreadlocked, laid-back musicians who’s puffing marijuana halfway through laying down rhythms. Even Bob Marley – the most renowned figure in the reggae music – is recognized as much for his pro-weed sensibilities as he was for his inspiring beats and socially aware lyricism.

It is believed that reggae is a way for people to express their opinions and way of life. And, this is how weed became tangled with the musical movement. The originators who established reggae music were the first ones to use the herb to get inspiration and enlightenment. Oftentimes, the disenfranchised artists use the weed to convey a message.

Ever since there has been reggae, it’s been linked with weed, like Batman & Robin, Bonnie & Clyde. In short, BFFs. What do you think is the key reason? Reggae music is brilliant. It gives a lecture to social issues such as equality, racism, being true to oneself, overcoming the odds of life, promoting sustainable living, having love, faith and so much more.

Once you toke a bit of marijuana and feel the reggae music, you will feel nothing but endless enlightenment like never before. It has been proven by many people out there, which is why they have been continuously writing their own reggae music and sharing it to other people. For some, smoking a weed while listening to the message of reggae music is such a pleasure.

If you want to try it for yourself, you should start with the right music. Why not listen to the beautiful songs “Could You Be Loved” or “Kaya” by Bob Marley? Kaya is a Jamaican word for cannabis. Or, the song “Legalize It” by Peter Tosh. This song by Peter Tosh tells of the differences between the struggles of the farmers, distributors and smokers that continuously depend on one of the most profitable cash crops in Jamaica, and cannabis prohibition.

Enlightening one’s feeling is one of the root causes why increasingly more people continue to turn to reggae music while puffing on marijuana. Others may not want this kind of activity, but many find it more pleasurable.

As stated by Bob Marley:

“When you smoke herb, herb reveals yourself to you. All the wickedness you do, the herb reveals itself to yourself, your conscience, show up yourself clear because the herb make you meditate. It is only a natural thing and it grows like a tree.”

What comes to mind when you hear reggae? For many, there are associated thoughts of Rastafaria and marijuana since reggae music has popularly been accompanied to the phil…

39th Annual Tribute to the Reggae Legends/ Bob Fest

WorldBeat Cultural Center

2100 Park Blvd · San Diego , CA

Подробности

This Valentine’s Weekend, February 15th and 16th, 2020 come join us for the 39th Annual Tribute to the Reggae Legends Fest aka Bob Fest — a Tribute to Vaughn Benjamin of Midnite/ Akae Beka. This all-ages two-day annual event features artists from Jamaica, Virgin Islands and California. Tribute to the Reggae Legends is a part of WorldBeat Center’s Black Future Month Celebrations.

You can get your tickets online on Eventbrite or at WorldBeat Center and Reggae World (in North Park). For more details call the Reggae Hotline[masked] or visit bobfestsandiego.com

2020 LINEUP, A REGGAE LEGENDS TRIBUTE TO VAUGHN BENJAMIN

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15TH

MYKAL ROSE (JAMAICA)
KING YELLOWMAN (JAMAICA)
K’REEMAH (JAMAICA)
SPIRITUAL (JAMAICA)
SOL REMEDY (CA)
THE ORIGINATORS (CA)
NATIVE AMERICAN DRUMMING BY TIM RED BIRD AND THE RED WARRIORS
DANZA AZTECA BLESSING
AFRICAN DRUM AND DANCE

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH

AKAE BEKA BAND (VIRGIN ISLANDS)
ARMY (VIRGIN ISLANDS)
SPIRITUAL (JAMAICA)
REEMAH (VIRGIN ISLANDS)
NINJAH P SOUNDSYSTEM (VIRGIN ISLANDS)
JUNYAH P (VIRGIN ISLANDS)
BOOSTIVE (CA)
DON CAMILO (CHILE) – Just added
INCIENT ROOTSMAN NYABINGHI (JA/ CA)
NATIVE AMERICAN DRUMMING BY TIM RED BIRD AND THE RED WARRIORS
DANZA AZTECA BLESSING

*Lineup subject to change

EACH DAY WILL FEATURE THE NEW SOBER CURIOUS BAR INCLUDING KOMBUCHA ON TAP

About the Festival

Tribute to the Reggae Legends Festival/ Bob Day, has been an annual event in San Diego for 39 years now. The Annual Festival is one of Southern California’s Largest Reggae events. WorldBeat Productions has been the spearhead for bringing Reggae Music to San Diego with artists like Peter Tosh, Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs, Bunny Wailer, Mikey Dread, Black Uhuru, Steel Pulse, Burning Spear, Lucky Dube, Jimmy Cliff and the brightest stars from Africa, Latin America, Europe and Asia.

The first Bob Marley Day was held at the International Blend on 30th Street and then moved the following years to the Jackie Robenson YMCA, Carpenters Hall, North Park Theatre and Adams Ave Theatre. After reaching its capacity in these venues it was time to bring the team’s hugely successful Bob Marley Day festival to the San Diego Sports Arena. After consistently selling out capacity shows for over 10 years, Bob Marley Day transformed into what it is now known as Tribute to the Reggae Legends in honor of all the great reggae artist that have passed throughout the years.

39th Annual Tribute to the Reggae Legends/ Bob Fest WorldBeat Cultural Center 2100 Park Blvd · San Diego , CA Подробности This Valentine’s Weekend, February 15th and 16th, 2020 come join